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A daily look back at the toys, games, and objects that captured our attention as children and continue to fascinate us today.
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Vintage Toys & Games

Explore classic toys and games that captured our attention and never let go.

Clue from Parker Brothers (1949)

Was it Colonel Mustard in the Conservatory with the candlestick? This is just one of the potential outcomes in the classic murder mystery game of Clue.

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Pony Plates from Tomy (1982)

Yee-haw! In 1982, Tomy released Pony Plates, a Western-themed variant on its popular Fashion Plates design kit. Children ages 6 and up could create personalized ranch scenes complete with horses, barns, and wilderness landscapes.

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Big Mouth Game from Schaper (1968)

Released in 1968 by Schaper, Big Mouth combines two of my favorite things–food and humor–into a single game.

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375 Castle: The Yellow Castle of Legoland

Graham Hancock, LEGO collector and deputy editor of Blocks magazine, examines one of the most widely recognized LEGO building kits from the iconic manufacturer.

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Guess Who? From Milton Bradley (1979)

Released in 1979, Guess Who? from Milton Bradley is a variation of the classic game of 20 Questions – a spoken parlor game that rose to popularity in the 19th century.

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Midgetoy (1946-1982)

In 1943, brothers Alvin and Earl Herdklotz established the A & E Tool and Gage Co. in Rockford, Illinois as a defense-based precision tool-and-die business. After World War II, focus shifted primarily to toy making. Operating under the name Midgetoy, the company began to produce basic, smaller-scale die-cast vehicles and airplanes at low price points.

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Scrabble: Squaring-off Family Game Night

Scrabble – the classic word game for two to four players – combined two concepts in a unique way. It’s both jigsaw puzzle and board game – an innovation that was perhaps a barrier to success in the game’s early days. Modern audiences, though, have embraced the game through its various evolving forms.

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Play ‘N Learn Computer from Playskool (1972)

In the 1970s, creativity met “Big Iron” in the Play ‘N Learn Computer from Playskool. Patterned after mainframe computers in use at the time, the toy was helped children with basic math, spelling, and matching skills.

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The Magnajector from Rainbow Crafts (1959)

Released in the late 1950s, the Magnajector from Rainbow Crafts (1959) was a kid-friendly opaque projector, and the company’s first foray outside of its iconic Play-Doh modeling compound.

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Rudy the Robot from Remco (1968)

Released in 1968 by New Jersey-based Remco, Rudy the Robot was touted for his ability to “walk like a man.”

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Star Trek Communicators from Mego (1974)

Released in 1974, Mego’s Communicator was a stylized walkie-talkie made to resemble the same device used on the Star Trek television show. Each walkie-talkie operated on a 9-volt battery and could send and receive voice messages up to 1/4 mile – perfect for alerting your landing party of pending danger!

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Classic Childhood Vinyl

Join Brian Washington – vinyl collector, writer, commercial artist, composer, and voice artist – as he offers a glimpse of his favourite childhood vinyl.

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Riviton from Parker Brothers (1977)

Billed in a $1,000,000 advertising campaign as “the toy that makes toys”, Parker Brothers’ Riviton construction system hit the market with impact in 1977.

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