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A daily look back at the toys, games, and objects that captured our attention as children and continue to fascinate us today.
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Tinkertoys

An advertisement for Tinkertoys from Playskool. The company acquired Tinkertoy in 1985 and redesigned the toy in 1992 for its 80th anniversary. Tinkertoys were inducted into the National Toy Hall of Fame in 1998.

Movie Viewer from Kenner (1975)

Kenner’s Movie Viewer was used to feature a variety of the company’s licensed properties, including Snoopy, The Six Million Dollar Man, The Bionic Woman, Star Wars and the movie Alien.

Celebrate Free Comic Book Day!

This Saturday, May 2, is Free Comic Book Day in North America. A quick scan of the comics on the list reveals a variety of genres that should appeal to a wide-range of age groups.

Barbie from Mattel

The first commercial for Barbie aired on the Mickey Mouse Club in 1959. The doll made its debut at the American International Toy Fair in New York on March 9, 1959.

Sesame Street FacTOYd

In 1970, Sesame Street’s Ernie reached #16 on the Billboard Hot 100 with his signature song “Rubber Duckie.”

Tunnels & Trolls

While it may be tempting to dismiss Tunnels & Trolls as merely a D&D knock-off, doing so would do a grave disservice to the entire product line and most certainly raise the ire of its dedicated fan base.

Wheelie-Bar

If you were looking for help “popping a wheelie” on your Sting Ray bike, the Wheelie-Bar from WHAM-O was your ticket to ride (literally).

Robot Commando from Ideal

Released in 1961 by the Ideal Toy Company, Robot Commando was a 19-inch tall robot constructed of red, blue, yellow, black and white plastic.

Mr. Potato Head FacTOYd

Mr. Potato Head is the official travel ambassador of Rhode Island, home to toy company Hasbro.

Mr. Machine from Ideal (1960)

Designed by Marvin Glass & Associates and released in 1960 by Ideal Toy Company, Mr. Machine became an instant hit for the company. The toy was essentially an updated version of the popular metal robots of the 1950s, except that Mr. Machine was made primarily of plastic.